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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Structure of the cotton economy of the antebellum South. found in the catalog.

The Structure of the cotton economy of the antebellum South.

The Structure of the cotton economy of the antebellum South.

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Published by Agricultural History Society in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southern States
    • Subjects:
    • Agriculture -- Southern States -- Addresses, essays, lectures,
    • Southern States -- Economic conditions -- Addresses, essays, lectures

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesAgricultural history.
      StatementEdited by William N. Parker.
      ContributionsParker, William Nelson, ed.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC107.A13 S84
      The Physical Object
      Pagination169 p.
      Number of Pages169
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5076861M
      LC Control Number74118999

      Cotton is King: The Antebellum South, – Preface; The Americas, Europe, and Africa Before and traders in the southern economy. In fact, owning land and slaves provided one of the only opportunities for upward social and economic mobility. In the South, living the American dream meant possessing slaves, producing cotton, and. Culture. The social structure of the Old South was made an important research topic for scholars by Ulrike B Phillips in the early 20th century. The romanticized story of the "Old South" is the story of slavery's plantations, as famously typified in Gone with the Wind, a blockbuster novel and Hollywood -Civil War Americans regarded Southerners as distinct people, who.

      resistance on plantations and farms across the South, as well as the impact of the cotton gin on the economics of slavery and Southern agriculture. (H) Craft and Structure South Antebellum Economy Farm Manufacture Slavery Acre Wage-EarningFile Size: KB. Political and economic leadership in the South by the end of the 18th century had moved from Virginia to South Carolina, especially Charleston, when it became clear that raw cotton was to be that state's and the region's essential product and that slavery was therefore necessary to the future.

        The book Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South (Cambridge Press—) by Keri Leigh Merritt, does much to set the record . The North and South in Antebellum United States In the time just before the Civil War, the United States was one of the most successful nations in the world. The United States had become the world’s leading cotton producing country and had developed industry, which would in .


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The Structure of the cotton economy of the antebellum South Download PDF EPUB FB2

Papers were published originally in Agricultural history, Jan., Includes bibliographical references. Self-sufficiency in the cotton economy of the antebellum South, by R.E.

GallmanThe structure of antebellum Southern agriculture: South Carolina, a case study, by R.C. Battalio and J. KagelProductivity and profitability of antebellum slave labor: a micro-approach, by J.D.

Foust and D. Book/Item: The Structure of the Cotton Economy in the Antebellum South. Author/Editors: William Parker Publisher: Agricultural History Society Publishing Date or Period: Edition: later. LOC/ISBN: Pages:Approx.

Approximate Size: 7" X 10 1/4" Cover: hardcover Dustjacket Description & Condition: None Book/Item Description: Great Item, see Rating: % positive.

The Political Economy of Slavery. Studies in the Economy and Society of the Slave South. New York: Pantheon, Parker, William, ed. The Structure of the Cotton Econony of the Antebellum South. Washington, D. C.: The Agricultural History Society, Wright, Gavin.

The Political Economy of. In the antebellum era—that is, in the years before the Civil War—American planters in the South continued to grow Chesapeake tobacco and Carolina rice as they had in the colonial era.

Cotton, however, emerged as the antebellum South’s major commercial crop, eclipsing tobacco, rice, and sugar in economic importance. Bythe region was producing two-thirds of the world’s cotton. The economy of the Antebellum era was separated according to North and South.

The economy of the North was characterized by industrialization, while the South was characterized by the "Cotton Kingdom". During this time period, the Northern economy was becoming more and more industrialized starting at the turn of the century.

Twentieth-century romantic portrayals of the antebellum South, such as Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone with the Wind () and the film adaptation, mostly ignored the role of yeomen.

The major challenge to the view of planter dominance came from historian Frank Lawrence Owsley’s book, Plain Folk of the Old South (). The antebellum South was an especially male-dominated society.

Far more than in the North, southern men, particularly wealthy planters, were patriarchs and sovereigns of their own household. Among the white members of the household, labor and daily ritual conformed to rigid gender delineations.

Men represented their household in the larger. The Structure of the Cotton Economy of the Antebellum South. Edited by William N. Parker. Washington, D. C.: The Agricultural History Society, Pp.

$ The Cotton Economy in the South. Sources. The Cotton Boom. While the pace of industrialization picked up in the North in the s, the agricultural economy of the slave South grew, if anything, more entrenched. In the decade before the Civil War cotton prices rose more than 50 percent, to cents a pound.

Booming cotton prices stimulated. Books shelved as antebellum-south: Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, The House Girl by Tara Conklin, The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom, Gone with the Win. The antebellum South was an especially male-dominated society.

Far more than in the North, southern men, particularly wealthy planters, were patriarchs and sovereigns of their own household. Among the white members of the household, labor and daily ritual conformed to rigid gender delineations.

The plantation-era South saw large expansions in agriculture while manufacturing growth remained relatively slow. The southern economy was characterized by a low level of capital accumulation (largely labor-based) and a shortage of liquid capital, which, when aggravated by the need to concentrate on a few staples, the pervasive anti-industrial, and anti-urban ideology, and the reduction of.

Books shelved as antebellum: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, The House Girl by Tara Conklin, Beloved by Toni Morrison, The Adventures of Huckleb. Learn antebellum economy with free interactive flashcards.

Choose from 35 different sets of antebellum economy flashcards on Quizlet. The Antebellum South (also known as the antebellum era or plantation era) was a period in the history of the Southern United States from the late 18th century until the start of the American Civil War in This period in the South's history was marked by the economic growth of the region, largely due to its heavy reliance on slavery, and of its political influence on the U.S.

federal. THE COTTON ECONOMY OF THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH The papers presented here are devoted to certain aspects of the economic history of southern agriculture in the later decades of the period of slavery.

The collection begins with four papers which examine characteristics of cotton farms and plantations as exhibited in a statistical sample drawn from. Labor, and the Industrialization of the South," Journal of Economic History, XXXVI (), The last strongly influenced Gavin Wright, The Political Economy of the Cotton South (New York, ); Fred Bateman and Thomas Weiss, A Deplorable Scarcity: The Failure of Industrialization in the Slave Economy (Chapel Hill, ).

By the start of the 19th century, slavery and cotton had become essential to the continued growth of America’s economy. However, bypolitical and economic pressure on the South placed a.

Slavery in the South A large proportion of whites in the South supported slavery even though less than a quarter of these whites actually owned slaves. They felt that slavery was a necessary evil and that it was an important southern institution.

The slave population in was just underslaves and of that o of these slaves were in the northern states. Term used to refer to the approzimately 3 decades before when "king" cotton and the slave labor dominated the economy of the southern states "King Cotton" production of short-staple cotton dominated the deep South (later dubbed "Cotton Kingdom", constituting nearly 2/3 of total export trade and bringing in nearly $ million a year.

Engerman, “The Antebellum South: What Probably Was and What Should Have Been,” in The Structure of the Cotton Economy, Diance Lindstrom, “Southern Dependence Upon Interregional Grain Supplies: A Review of the Trade Flows, ,” in. The antebellum South was an especially male-dominated society. Far more than in the North, southern men, particularly wealthy planters, were patriarchs and sovereigns of their own household.

Among the white members of the household, labor and Author: OpenStaxCollege.In the antebellum era—that is, in the years before the Civil War—American planters in the South continued to grow Chesapeake tobacco and Carolina rice as they had in the colonialhowever, emerged as the antebellum South’s major commercial crop, eclipsing tobacco, rice, and sugar in economic importance.

Bythe region was producing two-thirds of the world’s cotton.